FAQ

Research shows that peaceful civil disobedience is one of the most effective approaches to achieving rapid social change. The system that created our laws is the same system that is pushing us to the collapse of society as we know it. By carefully breaking the law through acts of civil disobedience that can include blocking roads, damage to property, and mass arrest, we not only show our defiance of the system, but also the personal price we are willing to pay when doing so.

Millions, if not billions, of lives have already been taken for profit - their victims just haven't died yet. Without unprecedented change in society, we risk social collapse this century. What is at stake is the very survival of most life on earth. It is crucial to remember that we still have time to act. Every fraction of a degree counts, every increase in the average temperature on Earth will mean more deaths and suffering. We know the theory of how to tackle this crisis and how to avoid the worst, the problem is not scientific but political.

Our goal is to create a truly global and radical scientific movement, that gives much needed credibility to the wider climate movement. There is a lingering public perception that activists are extremists who are exaggerating the problem and overreacting by breaking the rules. This perception is often aided by portrayals in the press. Dismissing activists in this way slows action on the climate and ecological crisis at a time when it is crucial that we speed up. Scientists becoming more involved in activism, particularly when it involves arrestable offenses, increases the credibility of civil disobedience. As one of our members puts it: "They can't just dismiss us as a bunch of hippies."

The majority of our group have a natural or social sciences background, but several of our members do not and we welcome everyone to join. For the actions, we expect that two thirds of the people are scientists (normally identified as wearing white labcoats).